Cows Adopt Babies Too

When we have a cow that won’t or can’t take care of her calf we often consider adoption.  If we already have a good mother cow that has just lost her calf, we make maternal magic happen! We have to be quick, though, because there is only a 1-3 day window when the cow would most likely take another baby.

In bovine adoption, there isn’t any paperwork to fill out, but there is a pretty, shall we say, interesting adoption process.

First we put the mother cow in the barn with her dead calf. We give her a little time to lick and bond with her lost baby before turning her back out in the corral.

Now this part is a little tough, but it’s the only way to really make sure the orphaned calf can be adopted. We carefully remove the hide of the dead calf, making sure to leave the tail and the bottom area intact because that is where the mother smells to make sure she has the right baby. Four lengthwise slits are made at the edge of the hide for the orphaned calf’s legs.

For the adoption process to move forward, we position the hide over the new calf and pull its legs through the slits. Baling twine is threaded through the leg holes and tied under the calf’s neck and belly to secure its new coat.

Now it’s time for the moment of truth! We put the mama cow in the barn where her dead calf was and show her the adoptee with its new coat. Most of the time the mama cow will give an affectionate little moo and we know she has accepted the calf as hers.

Now the calf may be reluctant at first and we, as the adoption experts, might need to get him up or nudge him in the cow’s direction from time to time. But hunger will always force him to accept his new mom. The adoption coat can be removed in a couple of days once the mama cow and calf are throughouly bonded.

The best part of this whole scenario is watching how carefully the cow looks after her newly revived calf. She’s going to make extra sure nothing happens to it this time.

From RealRancher, DeeAnn B. Price – Boulder, Wyo.

It runs in the family…

If you’ve spent much time around rural friends and relations, you’ve probably heard the overly romanticized term “family-run.”

Personally, the realist in me prefers it this way, “Family,  RUN!”

Between the family that lives there and the family that visits, on our farm there’s plenty of family to go around.  Mom had an interesting observation.  She says when family members express their selfless desire to “help out,” they really mean outside tasks only please.

The sink remains full of dishes, the mudroom boasts enough topsoil to raise a bumper crop, and the bumper crop of kin gives more thought to what they might find on their next trip to the dinner table than to how it got there.

They did manage to “help” this new mother though…

Poor lady, (the cow that is.)

Well, and Mom too.

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