Chicken Broods

Peep! Peep! Peep! is all you hear on the other end of the phone before the Postmaster says in a very excited voice, “I have a box of chicks for you. You can come anytime. Just knock on the back door.” After rushing to town, the chicks are brought home.

RealRancher Jonita Sommers discusses caring for chickens and baby chicks including feeding them anitibiotics.
Jonita Sommers picks up her chicks at the post office! She puts a little animal antibiotic in the water to help keep the chicks healthy after their stressful journey.

There are at least 25 because the hatchery will not ship less than twenty-five chicks. A heat lamp is hooked up and a jar of water with antibiotic is fixed so the chicks can drink. There is dirt put in the bottom of the box with some chick start feed. The chicks must eat dirt, so their craw and digestive system works correctly.

RealRancher Jonita Sommers discusses caring for chickens and baby chicks including why chickens eat dirt.
These hens are eating feed and dirt, which helps keep their digestive system functioning properly.

Each little chick is taken from the box and their little beak is dipped in the water a couple of times so they each have a drink. They are each set in the box of dirt and feed to eat. After an hour, they are put back in the box to sleep. This is repeated two more times the first day. If there is a sick chick, the chick is removed, wrapped in a blanket and put under the heat lamp by itself. If a chick gets sick it usually dies. It is live or die with them.

RealRancher Jonita Sommers discusses caring for chickens and baby chicks including feeding them anitibiotics.
As the chicks grow their mother hen continues to carefully care for them.

A setting hen is brought from the chicken house and put in the coup with two little chicks at night. If the two chicks are alive in the morning, the hen has accepted them. She is given the rest of the brood. A big hen can take care of 25 chicks. The heat from her body will keep the chicks warm. The chicks are darling when they sit on top of the hen. They think they are so wise when they manage to hop up on the hens back and perch there.

RealRancher Jonita Sommers discusses caring for chickens and baby chicks including hooking the chicks onto a mother hen.
The baby chicks like to hang out with (and hang on) their new mother.

When they get old enough and the weather permits, you can let them out of the coup. When the coup door is opened, the chicks dart out flapping their wings. The old hen puffs up and starts clucking in hopes she can keep them under control.

RealRancher Jonita Sommers discusses caring for chickens and baby chicks. These chickens could be considered "free range chickens."
The mother hen does her best to control her brood and make sure these free roaming chickens are kept away from the many predators they are susceptible too.

From RealRancher Jonita Sommers – Daniel, Wyo.

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